How to Become a Nurse Researcher

How to Become a Nurse Researcher

Duties, Responsibilities, Schooling, Requirements, Certifications, Job Outlook, and Salary

How to Become a Nurse Researcher

There are a variety of nursing specialties that registered nurses (RNs) can pursue upon earning their license. Every nursing career has its own distinctive job responsibilities, work environments, and perks. There are also varying educational requirements depending on the position. In this article, we’ll take a look at the RNs that are finding new ways to save lives, nurse researchers.

Nurse researchers are highly trained nurses that conduct scientific research into various aspects of healthcare. Nurse researchers create and implement scientific studies to improve healthcare services and patient outcomes.

For anyone looking to play a part in changing healthcare for the better, here’s a guide on how to become a nurse researcher. With this guide, you will understand the role of a nurse researcher, their job responsibilities, educational requirements, job outlook, and salary.

Nurse Researcher Definition

What Is a Nurse Researcher?

A nurse researcher is an advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) that studies various aspects of healthcare and illness. It is their responsibility to apply the rigor of scientific research to discover new methods for improving healthcare services and outcomes.

Nurse researchers have advanced training in scientific research and data collection in addition to their nursing training and certification.

Nurse Researcher: Job Description

What Does a Nurse Researcher Do?

Nurse Researcher: Job Description

As previously mentioned, nurse researchers design and implement scientific studies to improve healthcare services and patient outcomes. Their area of study within healthcare depends on their specialization and where they work. Some nurse researchers study diseases and illnesses, while others may study clinical trials to oversee a new treatment method or medication.

Nurse researchers are also responsible for finding subjects which are best suited to participate in their studies. Upon completion of their study, it’s their responsibility to compile their data into a report to share their findings with their immediate supervisors. Eventually, their research findings may also circulate to the larger healthcare community and public.

Nurse Researcher Jobs

Where Do Nurse Researchers Work?

Due to their high level of training and expertise, nurse researchers can work in a variety of healthcare settings. These include hospitals, research organizations, universities, and government agencies.

Some of the day-to-day responsibilities of nurse researchers include:

  • Creating and implementing scientific research studies
  • Supervising and observing patient care, treatments, or procedures
  • Collecting and analyzing data and information throughout their study
  • Compiling research findings into a report
  • Presenting research outcomes to superiors
  • Presenting results at conferences, meetings, and other speaking engagements
  • Recruiting participants for studies

Nurse Researcher Schooling & Certification

How Long Does It Take to Become a Nurse Researcher?

What Degree Do You Need to Be a Nurse Researcher?

Nurse Researcher Schooling & Certification

Like many of the highest paid nursing jobs, nurse researchers must be prepared to dedicate around 6 to 8 years towards higher education. Employers also favor candidates with sufficient experience in conducting clinical research. For that reason, many nurse researchers begin their careers as research assistants to gain enough experience for this highly specialized role.

Here are the steps required to become a nurse researcher:

1. Earn your Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree

The first step to becoming a nurse researcher is earning your BSN, or Bachelor of Science in Nursing Degree. A BSN program will take about three to four years to complete unless you’ve already earned your associate’s degree in nursing (ADN). Students who’ve already earned their ADN can enroll in an RN-BSN program which can be completed in as little as 20 months.

If you are a licensed vocational nurse with an associates degree in vocational nursing (ASVN), you can also earn your BSN degree through an advanced placement option (LVN to BSN). This accelerated nursing program allows you to skip the first year (three semesters) of the BSN program.

2. Pass the NCLEX-RN exam

Once you’ve earned your BSN, you’ll have to pass the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) to earn your nursing license. With the NCLEX, you’ll be certified to enter the workforce as a registered nurse (RN).

3. Earn a master’s or doctoral degree

Earning a Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) or doctorate degree from an accredited institution is required for becoming a nurse researcher. An MSN degree is the most common graduate degree earned by nurse researchers. You may also obtain your Ph.D. from an accredited institution. Depending on the type of research, some nurse researcher positions may require a Ph.D.. MSN degrees usually take about 18 – 24 months to complete, while doctorate degrees typically require 2-3 years of full-time education.

4. Gain experience working in clinical research

In order to be eligible for a nurse researcher certification exam, you’ll have to gain experience working as an RN in clinical research. The Society for Clinical Research Associates (SOCRA) requires two years of practice as a full-time registered nurse conducting clinical research to be eligible for their exam.

The Association of Clinical Research Professionals (ACRP) also requires a requisite number of hours of professional experience working as a nurse researcher prior to sitting for many of their exams.  

5. Pass the Nurse Researcher Certification exam

Upon receiving your Master’s or Doctorate degree, and completed your eligibility requirements, you may be required to earn a research certification for the position you wish to obtain. The Society for Clinical Research Associates (SOCRA) offers the Certified Clinical Research certification (CCRP).

The Association of Clinical Research Professionals (ACRP) offers several certifications in clinical research as well.

The eligibility requirements for each certification varies by exam. It’s crucial that you determine which certification is best for the position you are applying for and the career path you’d like to take.

Nurse Researcher Salary

How Much Do Nurse Researchers Make?

Nurse researchers rank amongst the highest paid nursing categories in the US. According to ExploreHealthCareers.org, the median annual wage earned by nurse researchers is $95,000.

What Is the Job Outlook for Nurse Researchers?

Unfortunately, the Bureau of Labor Statistics does not report any specific data on the job outlook of nurse researchers. However, it does indicate that the overall employment of medical scientists is projected to grow eight percent (8%) by 2026. This is slightly higher than the average growth of all occupations (7%).

APRNs will be increasingly utilized in team-based models of care. They will also be needed to care for the large, aging baby-boom population.

Nurse Researcher Career

Are You Ready to Start Your Career as a Nurse Researcher?

Although the educational requirements may be extensive, the boost in salary and job outlook make up for lost time.

Nurse researchers have the unique opportunity to improve our healthcare system and patient outcomes. The job is perfect for anyone who feels passionate about using scientific research to change the world. The work they do has the potential to affect millions of lives.

If you feel ready to begin your journey as a nurse researcher, you can start by earning your BSN degree at Provo College. Click here to learn more about our BSN program.

How to Become a Psychiatric Nurse

How to Become a Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner?

Duties, Responsibilities, Schooling, Requirements, Certifications, Job Outlook, and Salary

How to Become a Psychiatric Nurse

There are a variety of nursing specialties that registered nurses (RNs) can pursue upon earning their license. Every nursing career has its own unique job responsibilities, work environments, and perks. There are also varying educational requirements depending on the position. In this article we’ll explore one of the most challenging yet rewarding nursing specialties, psychiatric nursing.

Psychiatric nurse practitioners are highly trained nurses that specialize in treating patients diagnosed with mental health issues. They help patients manage their psychiatric disorders to live a better life. Registered nurses who have a passion for helping patient’s deal with their mental health issues gravitate towards this field.

For anyone considering this honorable profession, here is a comprehensive guide on how to become a psychiatric nurse practitioner. With this guide, you will understand the role of a psychiatric nurse, their responsibilities, educational requirements, job outlook, and salary.

Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner Definition

What Is a Psychiatric Nurse?

A psychiatric nurse practitioner is an advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) who is responsible for providing mental health services to patients. They work closely with their patients to ensure they are managing their mental illnesses and living productive lives.

Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner: Job Description

What Does a Psychiatric Nurse Do?

What Does a Psychiatric Nurse Do?

Psychiatric nurses help psychiatrists and other physicians create a treatment plan for the individualized mental health care their patients require. They begin by conducting interviews and assessments of their patients to learn about their condition. Throughout their treatment, psychiatric nurses provide supportive counseling, prescribe and administer medications, and educate patients and their family regarding mental illness. In some circumstances, psychiatric nurses may help patients perform daily tasks such as getting dressed and grooming.

Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner Jobs

Where Do Psychiatric Nurses Work?

Psychiatric nurses can work in a variety of healthcare settings that focus on mental health. These may include general hospitals, psychiatric specialty hospitals, substance abuse treatment centers, and community mental health clinics. Some psychiatric nurses work in correctional facilities as well as school systems.

Some of the day-to-day responsibilities for psychiatric nurses include:

  • Assessing patients to determine their mental health needs
  • Developing individualized treatment plans
  • Counseling patients throughout treatment
  • Prescribing and administering medication
  • Educating patients and their families regarding mental illness
  • Assisting patients with self-care activities

Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner Schooling & Certification

How Long Does It Take to Become a Psychiatric Nurse?

What Degree Do You Need to Be a Psychiatric Nurse?

Like many of the highest paid nursing jobs, psychiatric nurses must be prepared to dedicate around 2 to 3 years post BSN towards higher education, as well as an additional two years for gaining RN work experience. Due to the critical nature of their many responsibilities, the eligibility requirements for the psychiatric nursing certification exam are extensive.

Here are the steps required to become a psychiatric nurse:

1. Earn your Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree

The first step to becoming a psychiatric nurse is completing a pre-licensure Registered Nursing program at the bachelors level, such as a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree, or higher, such as an MEPN program (more on that in future posts!). A BSN program will take about three to four years to complete unless you’ve already earned your associate degree in nursing (ADN). Students who’ve already earned their ADN can enroll in an RN-BSN program which can be completed in as little as 20 months.

If you are a licensed vocational nurse with an associates degree in vocational nursing (ASVN), you can also earn your BSN degree through an advanced placement option (LVN to BSN). This accelerate nursing program allows you to skip the first year (three semesters) of the BSN program.

2. Pass the NCLEX-RN exam

Once you’ve earned your BSN, you’ll have to pass the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) to earn your nursing license. With the NCLEX, you’ll be licensed to enter the workforce as a registered nurse (RN).

3. Earn a Master’s or Doctoral Degree

Earning a Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) or doctorate degree from an accredited institution is required for becoming a psychiatric nurse practitioner. An MSN degree is the most common graduate degree earned by psychiatric nurses. You may also obtain your Ph.D. from an accredited institution. MSN degrees usually take about 18-24 months to complete, while doctorate degrees typically require 2-3 years of full-time education. Students enrolled in a graduate-level program will take courses such as neurophysiology, physiology, and pharmacology.

4. Gain Experience Working as an RN

Before sitting for the final certification exam, you’ll have to fulfill several requirements. The American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) requires two years of practice as a full-time registered nurse, 20 hours of relevant continuing education completed within three years, and a minimum of 2,000 hours of clinical practice over those two years.

5. Pass the American Nurses Credentialing Center Exam (ANCC)

Upon receiving your Master’s or Doctorate degree, and completing your eligibility requirements, you’ll be one step away from officially becoming a psychiatric nurse. To work as a psychiatric nurse, you’ll need to become certified by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC). The certification exam is computer-based and consists of 175 multiple-choice questions. Each candidate is given three and a half hours to complete the exam.  Upon successfully passing the exam, you are awarded your credential, and it is valid for five years.

Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner Salary

How Much Do Psychiatric Nurse Practitioners Make?

Psychiatric nurses rank amongst the highest paying nursing specialties. According to PayScale.com, the median annual wage earned by psychiatric nurses is $102,743. The lowest 10 percent of psychiatric nurses earned less than $81,000, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $135,000.

What Is the Job Outlook for Psychiatric Nurse Practitioners?

Unfortunately, the Bureau of Labor Statistics does not report any specific data on the job outlook of psychiatric nurses. However, it does indicate that the overall employment of nurse practitioners is projected to grow 28 percent by 2026. This is significantly higher than the average growth of all occupations (7%).

APRNs will be increasingly utilized in team-based models of care. They will also be needed to care for the large, aging baby-boom population.

Psychiatric Nurse Career

Are you ready to start your career as a Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner?

Mental health has become a focal point of society in the last decade. Now more than ever, we are acknowledging the importance of these illnesses and how they need to be treated. Psychiatric nurse practitioners are on the front lines when it comes to helping patients deal with their mental health issues. If you’re prepared to take on the rigorous training and educational requirements, psychiatric nursing can be a deeply gratifying career choice, especially for anyone who is truly passionate about helping others.

If you feel ready to begin your journey towards this psychiatric nursing, you can start by earning your BSN degree at Provo College. Click here to learn more about our BSN program.

How to Become a Nurse Midwife

How to Become a Nurse Midwife

Duties, Responsibilities, Schooling, Requirements, Certifications, Job Outlook, and Salary

How to Become a Nurse Midwife

There are a variety of nursing specialties that registered nurses (RNs) can pursue once they’ve earned their license. Every specialty has its own unique job responsibilities, work environments, and perks. There are also varying educational requirements depending on the position. Nurses who are passionate about helping patients through pregnancy, labor, and childbirth may find becoming a nurse-midwife the next step in their careers.

Nurse-midwives are highly trained nurses that specialize in the primary and reproductive care for women and their children. They work with mothers to ensure their safety during childbirth as well as the safety of the newborn child.

For anyone considering this noble profession, we put together a comprehensive guide on how to become a nurse-midwife. Continue reading to further understand the role of a nurse-midwife, their responsibilities, education requirements, job outlook, and salary.

Nurse Midwife Definition

What Is a Nurse Midwife?

A nurse-midwife is an advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) who is responsible for the gynecologic and primary care of women. Nurse-midwives specialize in women’s reproductive health and childbirth. They provide care to expectant mothers and their newborn babies during child labor and post-delivery.

Nurse Midwife: Job Description

What Does a Nurse Midwife Do?

What Does a Nurse Midwife Do?

As previously mentioned, nurse-midwives play a major role during childbirth. Their biggest responsibility is to ensure the safety of mother and child throughout the delivery process.

However, nurse-midwives also support the health and wellness of their patients before and after child delivery. They provide family planning services, gynecological checkups, and prenatal care.

Nurse Midwife Jobs

Where Do Nurse Midwives Work?

Since nurse-midwives have certification in both nursing and midwifery, there are several healthcare settings where they can work, both public and private. These include hospitals, birth centers, universities, and private physician practices.

Some of the daily responsibilities held by a nurse-midwife include:

  • Performing routine gynecological checkups
  • Coaching and caring for mothers throughout the labor and childbirth process
  • Educating women on their child-birth options based on their unique health conditions
  • Helping mothers create birth plans based on their preferences
  • Teaching new moms how to breastfeed and care for their babies
  • Providing newborn care for the first 28 days

Nurse Midwife Schooling & Certification

How Long Does It Take to Become a Nurse Midwife?

What Degree Do You Need to be a Nurse Midwife?

Like many of the highest paid nursing specialties, nurse midwives must be prepared to dedicate around 6 to 8 years towards higher education. Included in this time estimate is a period of general work experience, preferably in labor and delivery or maternal/newborn areas. That’s because many nurse mid-wife programs and employers prefer candidates with previous RN experience. Prospective nurse mid-wives will typically spend a few years on the job before applying to a graduate program.

With that in mind, here are the steps to becoming a nurse-midwife:

1. Earn your Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree

The first step to becoming a nurse-midwife is earning your Bachelor of Science in Nursing Degree (BSN). A BSN program will take about four years to complete unless you’ve already earned your associate’s degree in nursing (ADN). Students who’ve already earned their ADN can enroll in an RN-BSN program which can be completed in as little as 20 months.

2. Pass the NCLEX-RN exam

Once you’ve earned your BSN, you’ll have to pass the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) to earn your nursing license. Once you’ve passed the NCLEX, you’ll be certified as a nurse (RN) and prepared to jump into the workforce.

3. Gain Experience Working as an RN

Before applying to a midwifery program, candidates usually have at least one year of experience working as an RN. RNs with prior work experience have acquired a solid foundation in nursing and are better prepared to become effective nurse midwives, once they’ve graduated.

Furthermore, many graduate schools require a few years of experience before accepting students into their nurse practitioner programs.

4. Earn a Graduate Degree from an ACME-Approved Program

To become a certified nurse-midwife (CNM), candidates must earn a Master of Science in Nursing degree (MSN) from a program accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Midwifery Education (ACME). An MSN degree is the most common graduate degree earned by nurse-midwives. You may also obtain your Ph.D. from an ACME-approved program. MSN degrees usually take about 18-24 months to complete, while doctorate degrees typically require 2-3 years of full-time education.

5. Pass the National Certification Exam

Once you’ve earned your graduate degree, you’ll be one step away from officially becoming a nurse-midwife. Before entering the workforce, you’ll need to pass the official midwifery exam offered by the American Midwifery Certification Board (AMCB). The examination is computer-based and consists of 175 multiple-choice questions. Each candidate is given four hours to complete the exam.

Nurse Midwife Salary

How Much Do Nurse Midwives Make?

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reports that the median annual wage for nurse midwives was $103,770 as of May 2018.

The lowest 10 percent of nurse-midwives earned less than $70,100, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $151,070.

Nurse-midwives rank amongst the highest paying nursing specialties.

Highest Paying Industries for Nurse Midwives

Some of the highest paying industries for nurse midwives include:

IndustryAnnual Median Wage
Local Government, excluding schools and hospitals$155,650
Management of Companies and Enterprises$120,690
Outpatient Care Centers$114,450
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals$113,400
Colleges, Universities, and Professional Schools$103,520

Highest Paying States for Nurse Midwives

Some of the highest paying states for nurse midwives include:

StateAnnual Median Wage
California$133,990
Massachusetts$119,380
Maryland$122,740
Arizona$114,900
New Jersey$113,980

Highest Paying Cities for Nurse Midwives

Some of the highest paying cities for nurse midwives include:

CityAnnual Median Wage
Riverside, CA$170,590
San Francisco, CA$147,820
Los Angeles, CA$129,130
Cleveland, OH$124,950
Charlotte, NC$122,400

What Is the Job Outlook for Nurse Midwives?

The BLS reports that overall employment of nurse midwives will grow 21% by 2026. This is significantly higher than the average growth of all occupations (7%).

The overall job growth will occur due to an increase in the demand for health services. As the population continues to grow, more nurse-midwives will be needed to assist in pregnancies and childbirths.

Nurse Midwife Career

Are You Ready to Start Your Career as a Nurse Midwife?

Pregnancy and childbirth are some of the most important moments in a woman’s life. Nurse midwifery is a great option for those who are passionate about childbirth and looking to make a career out of providing care to mothers in need. While the educational requirements are extensive, the difference in salary and job responsibilities will make up for the time spent in school. If you’re looking to become a nurse-midwife, you can start by earning your BSN degree at Provo College.

Click here to learn more about our BSN program.

Duties, Responsibilities, Schooling, Requirements, Certifications, Job Outlook, and Salary

How to Become a Nurse Practitioner

Duties, Responsibilities, Schooling, Requirements, Certifications, Job Outlook, and Salary

Duties, Responsibilities, Schooling, Requirements, Certifications, Job Outlook, and Salary

There are several different nursing specialties that registered nurses (RNs) have the ability to pursue once they’ve earned their license. Each specialty has its own specific job responsibilities, work environments, and benefits. To reach these positions, there are varying education and certification requirements. For many nurses, becoming a nurse practitioner (NP) serves as the general next step in their career.

Nurse practitioners are RNs with advanced degrees and training, enabling them to work with a specialized group of patients. Once they’ve earned their graduate-level education, they can explore various fields to discover the nursing specialty that interests them the most.

We’ve put together a comprehensive guide for anyone who’s wondering how to become a Nurse Practitioner. Continue reading to better understand the role of a nurse practitioner, their responsibilities, school requirements, job outlook, and salary.

Nurse Practitioner Definition

What Is a Nurse Practitioner?

Nurse practitioners are advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs). They have earned advanced degrees in nursing, most commonly a Master’s of Science in Nursing (MSN) degree or Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree.). Nurse practitioners typically require a state APRN licensure, as well as a national certification in a patient group focus.

Due to their specialized education and training, nurse practitioners can provide higher levels of care than RNs, and hold responsibilities that RNs do not. For example, nurse practitioners have the ability to prescribe medications to patients while RNs don’t. They also have the ability to earn certifications in a larger variety of nursing specializations than RNs.

Nurse Practitioner: Job Description

What Does a Nurse Practitioner Do?

Nurse practitioners provide basic preventative health care to their patients. They can prescribe medication, examine and diagnose patients, and provide treatment. They perform many of the same job duties as a physician, and their advanced experience and training makes them increasingly indispensable to hospitals and healthcare facilities.

Nurse Practitioner Jobs

Where Do Nurse Practitioners Work?

Nurse practitioners can find work in a variety of healthcare settings, such as hospitals, nursing homes, and physician’s offices.

Some of the daily responsibilities held by a nurse practitioner include:

  • Assisting in providing primary care to patients
  • Administering medicines and treatments
  • Diagnosing acute health issues
  • Conducting diagnostic tests such as x-rays and EKGs
  • Educating patients on medication and managing their health
  • Maintaining medical records of patients

Nurse Practitioner Schooling

How Long Does It Take to Become a Nurse Practitioner?

What Degree Do You Need to be a Nurse Practitioner?

How Long Does It Take to Become a Nurse Practitioner?

Becoming a nurse practitioner requires extensive education and experience. While the benefits of becoming a nurse practitioner are great, you’ll have to dedicate about 6 – 8 years to higher education in order to become a NP.

The total time it takes to become a nurse practitioner varies depending on whether or not you decide to gain work experience as an RN before earning your graduate degree. Here are the steps you’ll need to take in order to become a nurse practitioner:

1. Earn your Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree

A common first step to becoming a nurse practitioner is earning your Bachelor of Science in Nursing Degree (BSN). A BSN program will take about 4 years to complete , unless you’ve already earned your associate’s degree in nursing (ADN). Students who’ve already earned their ADN can enroll in an RN-BSN program which can be completed in as little as 20 months.

2. Pass the NCLEX-RN exam

Once you’ve earned your BSN, you’ll have to pass the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) in order to earn your nursing license. Once you’ve passed the NCLEX, you can be licensed as a nurse (RN) and prepared to jump into the workforce.

3. Gain Experience Working as an RN

There are different opinions when it comes to higher education in nursing. For some, the accelerated path of education is seen as the most efficient option. Others find that rushing through nursing school to earn a graduate degree may leave you unprepared for the career responsibilities that lie ahead.

RNs with prior work experience have acquired a solid foundation in nursing and are better prepared to become effective nurse practitioners, once they’ve graduated. Furthermore, many graduate schools require a few years of experience before accepting students into their nurse practitioner programs.

4. Earn a Graduate Degree

The minimum degree requirement for becoming a nurse practitioner is a Master of Science in Nursing degree (MSN). An MSN degree is the most common graduate degree earned by nurse practitioners. You may also earn your PhD in a field related to healthcare administration or nursing education. MSN degrees usually take about 18-24 months to complete, while doctorate degrees typically require 2-3 years of full-time education.

5. Obtain State License and Certification

Once you’ve earned your graduate degree, you’ll be one step away from officially becoming a nurse practitioner. Prior to entering the workforce, you’ll need to obtain your state-specific advanced practice nursing license, as well as a national specialty certification. Earning your specialty certification qualifies you to enter your chosen nursing specialty or profession.

Nurse Practitioner Salary

How Much Do Nurse Practitioners Make?

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reports that the median annual wage for nurse practitioners was $107,030 as of May 2018.

The lowest 10 percent of APRNs earned less than $80,670, while the highest 10 percent earned more than $182,750.

Nurse practitioners rank amongst the highest paying nursing specialties.

Highest Paying Industries for Nurse Practitioners

Some of the highest paying industries for nurse practitioners include:

IndustryAnnual Median Wage
Personal Care Services$139,770
Community Food and Housing, and Emergency and Other Relief Services$131,930
Religious Organizations$126,650
Computer Systems Design and Related Services$121,490
Residential Intellectual and Development Disability, Mental Health, and Substance Abuse Facilities$117,440

Highest Paying States for Nurse Practitioners

Some of the highest paying states for nurse practitioners include:

StateAnnual Median Wage
California$133,780
Alaska$122,880
Massachusetts$122,740
New Jersey$122,100
New York$120,970

Highest Paying Cities for Nurse Practitioners

Some of the highest paying cities for nurse practitioners include:

CityAnnual Median Wage
New Bedford, MA$156,980
San Francisco, CA$150,790
Spokane, WA$148,440
Sumter, SC$145,890
Vallejo-Fairfield, CA$145,400

 What is the Job Outlook for Nurse Practitioners?

The BLS reports that overall employment of nurse practitioners will grow 36% by 2026. This is significantly higher than the average growth of all occupations (7%).

NPs also have the greatest job outlook amongst APRNs. Nurse practitioners will be needed to care for the baby-boom population. They will also be needed to treat the growing number of patients with acute and chronic health conditions.

Nurse Practitioner Career

Are you ready to start your career as a Nurse Practitioner?

Whether you’re a nurse looking to take the next step in your career, or if you’re just starting your nursing journey, becoming a nurse practitioner is one of the best ways to dive deeper into the world of nursing. You’ll have to commit time and money to education, but the increase in salary, benefits, and job outlook pays off over time. If you’re looking to become a nurse practitioner, you can start by earning your BSN degree at Provo College.

Click here to learn more about our BSN program.

How to Become a Pain Management Nurse (RN-BC)

How to Become a Pain Management Nurse (RN-BC)

Duties, Responsibilities, Schooling, Requirements, Certifications, Job Outlook, and Salary

How to Become a Pain Management Nurse (RN-BC)

Registered nurses (RN) have the unique ability to choose what they’d like to do with their careers after they’ve earned their license. There are several different nursing specialties to choose from, all with their own job responsibilities, work environments, and perks. Each of these specialties require different levels of education and certification as well. Becoming a pain management nurse is a great way to individualize your career as an RN; not to mention the position ranks among the top paying nursing jobs.

Pain management nurses are directly involved with the care of patients when they need the most relief from pain or trauma. Their main responsibility is to assess patients to determine the cause and extent of their pain, and then properly administer medication to relieve that pain.

We’ve put together a comprehensive guide for anyone who’s wondering how to become a pain management nurse. Continue reading to find out what you need to do to become a pain management nurse, as well as what makes this career so rewarding.

Pain Management Nurse Definition

What is a Pain Management Nurse (RN-BC)?

A pain management nurse is a registered nurse (RN) that specializes in helping patients deal with acute and chronic pain. Patients dealing with pain must be given the proper amount of medication in order to provide relief, without putting the patient in danger. Due to the increase in opioid abuse over the last decade, pain management nurses are needed to ensure proper medications are being administered while avoiding the risks associated with over-dependence or addiction for their patients.

Pain Management Nurse: Job Description

What Does a Pain Management Nurse Do?

What Does a Pain Management Nurse Do?

Pain managements nurses are mainly tasked with helping patients manage their pain. They begin by assessing their patients in order to determine the cause and severity of their pain. From there, they determine which form of medication will effectively help them. Educating patients on how they should cope with their pain or discomfort is also a crucial part of their job description. This prevents patients from forming addictive habits from any narcotic pain medications they’re given. In response to the recent spike in addiction, pain management nurses try to find alternative pain management techniques that don’t always require the use of narcotics.

Pain Management Nurse Jobs

Where Do Pain Management Nurses Work?

As a pain management nurse, you can find employment in several different healthcare facilities such as hospitals, clinics, and physician centers.

Some of the daily responsibilities held by a pain management nurse include:

  • Assessing individual medical and psychosocial patient care needs
  • Working with physician to develop a plan of care
  • Educating patients on treatments and recovery
  • Documenting patient response to treatment

Pain Management Nurse Schooling

How Long Does it Take to Become a Pain Management Nurse?

What Degree Do You Need to be a Pain Management Nurse?

In order to become a pain management nurse, you’ll need to spend 2-4 years in school earning your nursing degree (ADN or BSN). Once you’ve earned your certification, there are minimum requirements you must meet before you can apply for the pain management specialty certification. Here are the steps you’ll need to take in order to become a pain management nurse:

  1. Earn your Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) or Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree: The first step in becoming a Pain Management Nurse is earning your ADN or BSN degree. An ADN can take around 18 – 24 months to complete. A BSN will take about 4 years, unless you’ve already earned your associate’s degree in nursing (ADN). Students who’ve already earned their ADN can enroll in an RN-BSN program which can be completed in as little as 20 months. Many healthcare organizations prefer a BSN degree. In some cases, a BSN degree is considered a minimum requirement for employment. Keep that in mind when considering your chosen path to earning your nursing license.
  2. Pass the NCLEX-RN exam: Once you’ve earned your ADN or BSN, you’ll have to pass the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) in order to earn your nursing license. Once you’ve passed the NCLEX, you’ll be certified as a nurse and prepared to jump into the workforce.
  3. Earn your Pain Management Nurse Certification – The Registered Nurse-Board Certified Credential in Pain Management (RN-BC): To work as a pain management nurse, you’ll have to complete the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s (ANCC) exam specializing in pain management. These are the eligibility requirements for this certification according to the ANCC…
    • Hold a current, active RN license
    • Have practiced the equivalent of 2 years full-time as a registered nurse
    • Have practiced in a nursing role that involves aspects of pain management for at least 2,000 hours in the 3 years prior to applying for the examination
    • Have completed 30 hours of continuing education in the 3 years prior to taking the exam, of which a minimum of 15 hours must be related to pain management

The exam is computer-based and is offered during a 90-day period at a location nearest to you. You’ll be given 3 hours to complete the exam which consists of 150 questions. The exam costs $270 for members of the American Nurses Association, and $395 for non-members. The credential is valid for 5 years, and you can continue to use the credential by submitting a renewal application up to 1 year prior to expiration.

Pain Management Nurse Salary

How Much Do Pain Management Nurse Make?

According to Indeed, pain management nurses make an average annual salary of $110,107. Salaries may vary depending on the city and state of employment, organization of employment, and degrees or certifications held. Pain management nurses make the 2nd most out of all the highest paid nursing specialties.

What is the Job Outlook for Pain Management Nurses?

The Bureau of Labor Statistics does not provide any specific data pertaining to the job outlook of pain management nurses. However, it does report that employment of registered nurses as a whole will grow 15% by 2026. As employment grows for all registered nurses, RN’s that are specialized in pain management will most likely have a greater job outlook than those without certification.

Pain Management Nursing Career

Are you ready to start your career as a Pain Management Nurse?

Becoming a pain management nurse requires a commitment to patience. You’ll have to spend time working as an RN before you can apply to earn your pain management certification. However, once you’ve put the time and effort in, earning that certification will allow you to maximize your earning potential as a nurse. You’ll also find yourself having greater responsibilities at your job, which for many can be very rewarding. If you’re looking to become a pain management nurse, you can start by earning your BSN degree at Provo College. To learn more about our BSN program, click here.

How to Become a Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA)

How to Become a Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA)

Duties, Responsibilities, Schooling, Requirements, Certifications, Job Outlook, and Salary

How to Become a Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA)

Registered nurses (RN) have the unique ability to choose what they’d like to do with their careers after they’ve earned their certification. There are several different nursing specialties to choose from, all with their own job responsibilities, work environments, and perks. Each of these specialties require different levels of education and certification as well. For some nurses, compensation is key. If that’s the case for you, then you may want to look into becoming a certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA).

Nurse Anesthetist is one of the highest paid nursing jobs for a reason. They’re responsible for administering anesthesia to patients prior to medical operations as well as handling recovery once they’re completed. Due to the high stakes of working with anesthesia, CRNA’s must complete extensive education requirements in order to earn their license.

We’ve put together a comprehensive guide for anyone who’s wondering how to become a certified registered nurse anesthetist. Continue reading to find out what you need to do in order to become a CRNA, as well as what makes this career so redeeming.

Nurse Anesthetist Definition

What is a Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA)?

A certified registered nurse anesthetist is a registered nurse who administers anesthesia to patients that are undergoing surgical or other medical procedures. CRNA’s work with surgeons, anesthesiologists, and other medical professionals in order to safely administer anesthesia. Nurse anesthetists can work in hospitals, clinics, and outpatient settings.

What Does a Nurse Anesthetist Do?

What Does a Nurse Anesthetist Do?

Nurse anesthetists are advanced practice registered nurses (APRN). Their primary responsibility is to work with patients throughout their medical procedures to ensure that they are pain free. In order to do this, CRNA’s must determine the exact amount of anesthesia that is needed in order to safely medicate the patient. Going under anesthesia can be a nerve racking experience to some patients, so as a nurse anesthetist you’ll need to be extremely responsible as well as accommodating to the patient’s needs.

Some nurse anesthetist duties include:

  • Determining the proper dose of anesthetic to meet patient’s need
  • Educating patients about the procedure and their recovery
  • Monitoring patient’s vitals and dosage throughout the procedure
  • Conducting patient assessments

CRNA’s can also take on administrative roles later in their career, such as training new staff or ordering the anesthesia.

Nurse Anesthetist Vs Anesthesiologist

What’s the Difference Between an Anesthesiologist and a Nurse Anesthetist?

Nurse anesthetists and anesthesiologists often work together to administer anesthesia to patients. However, the main differences between a nurse anesthetist and an anesthesiologist is their educational background, working environment, and salary.

Anesthesiologists are medical doctors, which means they spend upwards of 11 to 12 years in school before they can begin working. They must first earn their bachelor’s degree, then their medical degree, and finally they must obtain a state and national license. CRNA’s are only required to earn their bachelor’s degree, spend a year working in critical care, then complete a CRNA program which takes about 2-3 years.

Nurse anesthetists work in a variety of medical offices, such as hospitals, outpatient care centers, and doctor’s offices. Anesthesiologists work in operating rooms, as well as intensive care units and delivery units. Anesthesiologists also have the ability to focus on certain sub-specialties of care such as pediatrics, obstetrics, and critical care.

The difference in wages is possibly the most substantial difference between a CRNA and an Anesthesiologist. According to the BLS, the median salary of a CRNA is $167,950, while the median salary for Anesthesiologists is $267,020. With just under $100k dollars in added salary, the extended educational requirements of becoming an Anesthesiologist pay off in the end.

Nurse Anesthetist Schooling

How long does it take to become a Nurse Anesthetist?

In order to be a nurse anesthetist, you’ll have to spend an extended amount of time in school. You’ll also have to gain work experience and pass a certification exam prior to holding the position. Here’s a step-by-step guide to show you how to become a nurse anesthetist:

  1. Earn your Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) or similar degree: The first step in becoming a CRNA is earning your BSN nursing degree. Your BSN will take you about 4 years, unless you’ve already earned your associate’s degree in nursing (ADN). Students who’ve already earned their ADN can enroll in an RN-BSN program which can be completed in as little as 20 months. Students enrolled in a BSN program take courses such as anatomy, pharmacology, and physiology. The average cost of a BSN program can range between $40k – $100k depending on which educational institution you decide to attend. Once you’ve earned your BSN, you’ll have to pass the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX) in order to earn your nursing license.
  2. Gain at least one year of experience working as an RN in a clinical setting: The second step to becoming a nurse anesthetist is gaining quality experience working as an RN. It’s standard that RN’s looking to apply for a nurse anesthesia program spend at least one year working in a clinical setting such as an emergency room (ER), intensive care unit (ICU), or cardiac care unit (CCU). To further their chances of getting accepted, many RN’s earn their Critical Care Registered Nurse Certification (CCRN). In order to earn your CCRN, you’ll need 1,750 hours of direct critical care as well as pass a licensure exam.
  3. Get accepted and complete a nurse anesthesia program: Admission to a nurse anesthesia program can be highly competitive, and you’ll need to meet a set of minimum requirements to be considered for acceptance. These requirements vary depending on the institution offering the program. The AANA reports that as of August 2019, there were 121 accredited nurse anesthesia programs in the United States. They also reported that the average experience held by RN’s applying to nurse anesthesia programs is about 2.9 years. The average tuition and fees for a nurse anesthesia program is around $50,077. Before you begin applying, it’s important to assess your own qualifications and determine which program best fits you.
  4. Graduate from the nurse anesthesia program with your master’s degree: The average completion time of a nurse anesthesia program is about 24 to 36 months. Nurse anesthesia programs consist of courses such as anesthesia pharmacology, pain management, anesthesia biology, and anesthesia pathophysiology. Throughout the program, you’ll learn to operate anesthesia equipment as well as manage surgical and emergency situations. On top of coursework, students are required to complete supervised clinical experiences that present an array of different anesthesia situations.
  5. Pass the National Certification Examination from the National Board of Certification and Recertification for Nurse Anesthetists (NBCRNA): Once you’ve successfully completed your CRNA program and earned your master’s degree, you’ll need to pass the NCE. This exam contains between 100 and 170 questions, and takes about 3 hours to complete. Upon completion of the exam, you’ll be given a preliminary pass or fail report. Once you pass the exam there will be a verification of your certification sent to your state board of nursing. From there you are able to complete any state-specific requirements prior to employment.

In order to remain employed as a CRNA you’ll have to maintain your national certification. The NBCRNA evaluates nurse anesthetists every 8 years as part of their continued professional certification program (CPC), which is broken into two 4 year periods. During each 4 year period you are required to complete:

    • 60 “Class A” Credits in activities related to the delivery or improvement of anesthesia care
    • 40 “Class B” Credits in anesthesia practice as well as a wide range of professional development topics
    • 4 Core Modules which address applied clinical pharmacology, human physiology and pathophysiology, airway management, and anesthesia equipment

At the end of each 8 year period, you’ll be required to take the CPC assessment exam. This exam consists of 150 questions that test how well you know the 4 Core Modules. There’s definitely a lot of work required in order to maintain your CRNA certification, but the hard work pays off when it comes to job outlook and salary.

Nurse Anesthetist Pay

How much does a Nurse Anesthetist make?

Nurse anesthetist’s top the list of the highest paid nursing jobs. According to the BLS, the average nurse anesthetist salary is a substantial $169,450.

CRNA’s earning in the lowest 10th percentile make an average annual wage of $110,520, while the 90th percentile make an average annual wage of $208,000.

Some of the highest paying industries for nurse anesthetists include:

IndustryAnnual Median Wage
Outpatient Care Centers$194,440
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals$184,590
Specialty Hospitals (except Psychiatric and Substance Abuse Hospitals)$178,920
Federal Executive Branch (OES Designation)$168,580
Offices of Physicians$162,430

Some of the highest paying states for nurse anesthetists include:

StateAnnual Median Wage
Montana$252,460
Wyoming$250,610
California$217,230
Oregon$207,480
Iowa$198,140

Some of the highest paying cities for nurse anesthetists include:

CityAnnual Median Wage
San Francisco, CA$243,390
Providence, RI$238,030
San Diego, CA$237,960
Oakland, CA$230,290
Spokane, WA$227,700

Nurse Anesthetist Jobs

What is the job outlook for a Nurse Anesthetist?

The BLS reports that overall employment of nurse anesthetists is projected to grow 16% from 2016 to 2026, which is much faster than the average of all occupations (7%). Nurse anesthetists will be increasingly needed to care for the large, aging baby boom population. CRNA’s will be needed to keep patients healthy and to treat the growing number of patients with chronic and acute conditions.

Are you ready to start your career as a Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist?

Nurse anesthetists are the highest paid nurses in the field, but it comes with a cost. You’ll be spending a significant amount of time in school just earning the qualifications and certifications you’ll need in order to get a job as a CRNA. Earning your master’s degree also costs a lot of money, and that financial commitment can turn many people away. However, if you’re willing to commit your time and money to becoming a nurse anesthetist, your efforts will pay off in the end. Working as a CRNA is also very redeeming for those who thrive under pressure and take pride in handling the lives of their patients. If you’re looking to become a nurse anesthetist, you can start by earning your BSN degree at Provo College. To learn more about our BSN program, click here.